Review: A MURDER UNMENTIONED by Sulari Gentill

AMurderUnmentionedGentillThe problem with having read, loved and reviewed the five previous instalments of Sulari Gentill’s wonderful series of crime novels set in 1930’s Australia (and beyond) is that I am running out of superlatives with which to gush like a schoolgirl intelligently describe this enchanting series. Happily for us all Ms Gentill does not share my lack of creativity.

Most of the action in this sixth novel takes place at the Sinclair family’s rural estate Oaklea where ambitious landscaping plans lead to the discovery of the gun used in the killing of Rowland and Wilfred Sinclair’s father over a decade earlier. At the time the death was assumed by the authorities to have occurred during the commission of a burglary but when they receive some insider information on top of the gun’s discovery, police start looking closer to home for possible culprits of the unsolved crime.

Fans of the series will be pleased that all their favourite characters are back and in top form. Rowly’s three friends, who have been with him through all his adventures once again combine their talents to help Rowly and his family in a myriad of ways, though I think it’s Milt the plagiarising poet who goes above and beyond the call of duty on this occasion. One of the particular strengths of this novel is its depiction of the complex relationship between Rowly and Wil. The brothers have struggled to see eye to eye due to their different approaches to life, but when both come under suspicion at different points each does his utmost to protect the other. This unwavering loyalty and they way they learn to see how the other has experienced life differently even though they are part of the same family strikes a very realistic chord. It is rare that adult sibling relationships are depicted so completely.

Although A MURDER UNMENTIONED is, overall,  a light-hearted novel it is not without troubling themes. We learn a sad secret from the Sinclair family’s closet in a demonstration that even families which appear to ‘have it all’ often hide terrible traumas. And Rowly is still struggling to get people in authority to accept how dangerous the Nazis in Germany are; something he knows first hand due to the experiences depicted in PAVING THE NEW ROAD (the fourth book of this series).

In short then there is nothing not to like about A MURDER UNMENTIONED. There’s family drama, unrequited love, a suspenseful mystery, a blazing fire which must be escaped and the ever-popular cameo appearances from some of our history’s famous faces (including a yet-to-be prime minister and one of our pioneering landscape gardeners). This is all wrapped up in a thoughtful, intelligent and amusing story that rips along at a cracking pace. Released here this month A MURDER UNMENTIONED is highly recommended reading.


In order the earlier novels in this series are A FEW RIGHT THINKING MEN, A DECLINE IN PROPHETS, MILES OFF COURSE, PAVING THE NEW ROAD and GENTLEMEN FORMERLY DRESSED


Publisher: Pantera Press [2014]
ISBN/ASIN: 9781921997433
Length: 375 pages
Format: paperback
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One thought on “Review: A MURDER UNMENTIONED by Sulari Gentill

  1. Just finished A MURDER UNMENTIONED tonight, Bernadette, and I fully concur with your review. I’m in awe of Sulari’s ability to shift focus from broad (Hitler’s Germany) to narrow (family estate in rural NSW) in this series, all the while holding her readers’ interest through pace and character development.

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