Review: ROMEO’S GUN by David Owen

Storytelling is the social and cultural activity of sharing stories, often with improvisation, theatrics, or embellishment.

romeosgunowenThat’s the definition according to Wikipedia anyway. I went looking for it because as I read David Owen’s latest offering I thought that to call it a novel is a little misleading. It is one, of course, but it is also something else. An old fashioned yarn. An adventure tale. Something you can imagine being slowly doled out by a grizzled chap in a pub somewhere off the beaten track.

On the surface it is about the probable death of a sommelier (his body goes missing before death can be confirmed by anyone official), the growing-cold hunt for the killer of a teenage girl and the myriad ways bureaucracy is screwed. But this is not a story that goes from point A to point B in a nice, orderly fashion. Its embellishments, improvisations and theatrics include the mechanics of international drug smuggling, a lesson in trout fishing, a disguise, a brief history of Cathedral building and musings on the nature of light. I know it sounds like these things might be irrelevant but you’ll have to take my word that none of them are.

The storytelling element of ROMEO’S GUN is heightened by the fact it is told from the first-person point of view of a larger than life person. Franz “Pufferfish” Heineken is – in my mind at least – a little like a good Jack Thompson character. As he was in The Sum of Us for example. Prone to prickliness, bored by other people’s bullshit, easily perceived the wrong way by people too dense or self-involved to see his true qualities. The kind of bloke any sensible person would want on their side in a fight. I often find the first-person perspective unbelievable – or at least unrelatable – because the narrators seem to think with a coherence my own inner voice generally lacks. But Pufferfish’s voice – with some half-formed thoughts and idiosyncratic shorthand – rings very true.

True Blue too. Funny that two ‘foreigners’, Pufferfish (who is Dutch) and his creator (born in South Africa), consistently deliver such a thoroughly Australian sensibility. The evocative setting, the idiom-filled sentences, the way that various social scenes play out are all tied irrevocably to this country or, even more locally, to the often maligned island state we occasionally leave off the map. Though some of those experiences are shared by mainlanders. In my city we too are often visited by highly-paid, expensive suit-wearing ‘experts’ from Sydney over supplied with presentations and recommendations for how we should do things their way improve. In ROMEO’S GUN it is a mythical company called EmploySolution (which of course is referred to as FinalSolution by Puff and his chums) putting the Tasmanian Police Force in general and Pufferfish in particular under its microscope with a view to the eradication of unnecessary spending. It’s a different company in my real world but the same result: roles which perform actual work get cut while roles for managers and executives who do precious little of use quadruple.

I collected ROMEO’S GUN from my post box on the last working day before Christmas which did wonderful things for my seasonal spirit. My delighted anticipation quickly turned into genuine satisfaction as I started reading it almost immediately and found myself once again enveloped in the funny, clever, complicated and mildly cynical world of Franz Heineken. If you are not already a fan of this series you could easily start here. It works as a self-contained story even with its occasional references to earlier events. And then, as I did when I first discovered the series at book six, you can begin your own frustrating quest to track down the out-of-print earlier titles.


Publisher: Fullers Bookshop [2016]
ISBN: 9780994561152
Length: 360 pages
Format: paperback

8 thoughts on “Review: ROMEO’S GUN by David Owen

  1. Oh, this definitely sounds like my sort of story, Bernadette. There’s just something about one of those adventure stories (and I like your description of it, too – a pub story). When they’re done well, they really are satisfying. And if it’s any sort of satisfaction, they same thing happens with company roles where I am… At any rate, I am glad you enjoyed this one!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Thanks for reminding me about David Owen, Bernadette. I enjoyed the authentic feel of the early books in the series, but I’d forgotten about him

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Hi Bernadette, where did you order the book from? Like you I’ve had difficulties tracking down earlier books in this charming series,

    Like

    • The most recent two books (this one and 13 POINT PLAN FOR A PERFECT MURDER which came out early in 2016 are available via Booktopia (an Australian owned online bookseller) but the earlier books are only available second hand these days. Though it seems that David Owen’s current publisher does have the rights to re-release them so we might be lucky 🙂

      Like

Comments are closed.