A blessing of awards for Australian crime fiction

In the interests of full disclosure I should admit that the collective noun ‘blessing’ apparently applies to unicorns but since I’m not convinced fictional creatures should get a noun all of their own I thought I’d borrow it for my purpose. Due to life…and death…getting in the way I have been remiss in discussing all the recent awards that have come the way of Australian crime writers lately but I’m hoping the old adage “better late than never” still applies to most of life’s awkwardnesses.

LifeOrDeathRobothamAudioIn reverse order, timeline wise, we’ll start with congratulating Michael Robotham whose LIFE OR DEATH won the prestigious British Crime Writer’s Association Gold Dagger Award this week. It’s a standalone novel that starts with the premise of a young man escaping from a Texas prison on the day before he is due to be released. Driven equally by in-depth character development and a heart-stopping plot it’s easy to see why the judges were taken with this novel, even with its impressive competition. Kerrie reviewed the novel here at Fair Dinkum Crime (and though I didn’t review the novel I concur with her sentiments and can also recommend the audio version of the book beautifully narrated by John Chancer). An article in Today’s Sydney Morning Herald provides some background information on the novel and Michael’s history as a writer, including a heartfelt admission on the downside of being a ghost writer.

BigLittleLiesMoriartyNext we move to the 2015 Davitt awards for crime writing by Australian women which were announced on August 29. Best Adult Crime Novel went to Liane Moriarty for the surprise crime novel BIG LITTLE LIES. As this book is set to be a film starring ‘our’ Nicole I suspect this is not the last we’ve heard of this particular title. Other winners on the night included Ellie Marney for Best Young Adult Novel with EVERY WORD and Caroline Overington for LAST WOMAN HANGED which took out the Best Non-Fiction category. The Reader’s Choice Award (voted by members of Sisters in Crime) went to Sandi Wallace’s TELL ME WHY. And because she is one of my favourite authors ever I can’t let this occasion pass without noting the Highly Commended certificate judges gave to Sulari Gentill’s A MURDER UNMENTIONED in the Best Adult Novel category.

EdenCandiceFoxFinally we must mention this year’s Ned Kelly Awards, winners of which were announced earlier in August. Candice Fox’s second novel EDEN took out the Best Crime Novel Award while Helen Garner’s THIS HOUSE OF GRIEF won in the Best True Crime category and QUOTA by Jock Serong was voted Best First Crime novel. We’ve been a bit remiss here at FDC in not reviewing any of these but at least two of these are buried in my mountain of unread books so I will get to them. One day.

I think that’s it for all the missed news, our belated congratulations to all.

 

 

Review: TELL ME WHY by Sandi Wallace

TellMeWhyWallaceSandi22585_fGeorgie Harvey is a Melbourne-based writer who starts looking for a possibly missing elderly woman from the nearby country town of Daylesford as a favour to a friend. In that town John Franklin, one of the local policemen, is investigating a series of threatening letters being sent to new mothers in the area and he’s not too interested when Georgie tries to involve police in her hunt for the missing Susan Pentecoste. But Georgie becomes convinced Susan’s sudden disappearance is more sinister than it appears on the surface as she starts to uncover links to major incident five years earlier.

Rural settings have had something of a resurgence in local publishing in recent years so it doesn’t surprise me to see a crime novel labelled as the first in a series of rural crime files. Happily though this is more than just bandwagon-jumping as Wallace clearly knows the locations in which the events she depicts take place, making the setting of this novel is one of its strengths and giving the reader a sense of the realities of small town life.

The story too is well constructed with both plot lines developing nicely over the course of the novel. Although there are the requisite red herrings I liked the fact that the resolution to both major plot elements were grounded in reality and didn’t get lost down rabbit holes involving the kind of lunatics you only find in fiction as I feared might happen towards the beginning of the novel.

I also enjoyed the way the main characters were developed. Both are strong characters with lots of good qualities and some annoying ones, like most people, and are very believable. John Franklin’s troubles as a single parent, including the impact this has on his career aspirations, is well drawn as is Georgie’s desire to hang on to the few family-like connections she has in her life. For me the romantic tension between these two characters felt forced and unnecessary but I’ll admit to being almost completely fed up with the “will they, won’t they” kind of plot line.

Overall though TELL ME WHY is an above average debut novel with lots of promise for future instalments. It feels very Australian without relying on out-dated clichés and has a good story with engaging characters. I’ll be keeping an eye out for rural crime files number two.


Publisher: Clan Destine Press [2014]
ISBN: 9780992329662
Length: 330 pages
Format: paperback
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